Zajicek (Hare) and Riemer Genealogy Pages

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101 Andrew and Diana Chvoy

Andrew and Diana Chvoy, ages 62 and 59, passed away suddenly Aug. 14, 2008, late of Romeoville. Loving parents of Darrel (Bernadette) Chvoy and David (Kelli) Chvoy; cherished grandparents of Helen, Henry, Holly, Natalie and Joseph. Diana is also survived by her mother Dolores Pazereckis; a brother Alan Pazereckis; and a sister Linda (Carl) Siran; and nephew Carl John Siran. Visitation Monday, 3 to 9 p.m. at the Anderson Memorial Chapel, 606 Townhall Dr. in Romeoville. Funeral Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2008, family and friends will meet at Peace Memorial Church, 10300 W. 131st St. in Palos Park, IL 60464, for an 11 a.m. service. Interment to follow St. Casimir Cemetery in Chicago. 815-886-2323
Published in the Chicago Tribune on 8/18/2008

Husband, Wife Dead from Apparent Murder-Suicide in Romeoville
Last Edited: Thursday, 14 Aug 2008, 3:35 PM CDT
Created: Thursday, 14 Aug 2008, 3:35 PM CDT

A husband and wife were found dead in their southwest suburban Romeoville home Wednesday night from an apparent murder-suicide.

Diane Chvoy, 59, and Andrew Chvoy, 62, were found shot in their home at 1067 San Mateo Drive in Romeoville. An autopsy Thursday determined Diane Chvoy died of a single gunshot wound to the head and Andrew Chvoy died from an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head, according to a release from the Romeoville police.

Police arrived at the home to check on the couple at 5:53 p.m. after their son reported that he had been unable to get in contact with his parents for several days. Officers discovered the front door was barricaded by a chair from the inside, but forced entry through the door and found the couple's bodies.

Diane Chvoy was lying on the bed in a bedroom and Andrew Chvoy was discovered lying on the floor of a utility room. One .25 caliber shell casing was found next to each body and a 6.35 mm was also recovered from the home, the release said.

Detectives are investigating the possibility that the shootings were a murder-suicide committed by Andrew Chvoy, Romeoville police Lt. Steve Lucchesi said. Neighbors told The Herald News that police said there is no evidence to suggest a home invasion.

Not much was known about the couple as neighbors said they kept to themselves most of the time. However, someone did say that two dogs were seen running out of the house Wednesday night.

Police had never been called to the residence in the past, according to Lucchesi, who would not comment on whether the Chvoy’s had marital problems or a history of violence.

Police continue to investigate the case Thursday afternoon. They remained at the scene until 2:30 a.m. Thursday and returned later Thursday morning.

A Will County Coroner’s office spokewoman declined to comment.
 
PAZERECKIS, Diana Lee (I00041)
 
102 Anglican Parish Registers Source (S384)
 
103 article in the Grand Forks Herald Family F01295
 
104 Banks, Ray, comp.. <i>World War I Civilian Draft Registrations</i>. Source (S315)
 
105 Bessie attended Cooper Elementary School and graduated 1902 from Medill High School. BIRTH, MARRIAGE, & DEATH RECORDS The News-Gazette (Champaign, Illinois), 13 Dec 1966: Mrs. Edward G. (Bessie) Fisher, 510 S. Highland Ave., C[hampaign], died at 4 a.m. Tuesday (Dec. 13, 1966) at Mercy Hospital. She had been ill for several months. Memorial services will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday at Heritage Chapel of Firsesbyterian Church with Rev. Malcolm Nygren officiating. Burial will be in the Bohemian National Cemetery at Chicago. There will be no visitation. Mittendorf Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. She was born in Chicago, daughter of Frank and Anna Zak Tomek. She lived at the Highland Street address for three months and prior to that had lived in River Forest. She was married to Edward G. Fisher, who preceded her in death. She was also preceded in death by her parents, one brother and two sisters. She is survived by one son, Edward G. Fisher, Jr., Golden, Colo.; one daughter, Mrs. T. J. (Virginia) Dolan, 510 S. Highland, C; four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren; one brother, George Tomek, Oak Park; and one sister, Mrs. John P. Lubking (Georgina), Delano, Calif. HISTORY & BIOGRAPHY Bessie Edith (Tomek) Fisher wrote this account of her family - - - - - - - - - -: Anna Tomek's Family Statistics Grandfather Zak born April 4, 1837 Grandmother Zak born Mar, 1837 Both married at 21. Their children Joseph born 1859 Marie (Aunt Fiala) Sept. 17, 1860 Rose (Aunt Mandle) Sept. 1, 1862 Anna (our Mother) Jan. 26, 1866 James Sept. 1, 1871 Thomas Emile Dec. 21, 1878 Grandfather Zak died Feb. 21, 1884, 46 years of age Grandmother Zak died Aug. 1, 1890 - 53 years old Aunt Fiala died June 8, 1924 Uncle Joe in Apr 1885 Uncle Abe (Emile) July 25, 1915 - Drowned when the Eastland boat went down in the Chicago River. - - - - - - - - - - Statists of Tomek Family: Frank Cyril Tomek born Dec. 29, 1854. Died Jan 1924. Anna Zak, born Jan. 26, 1866. Died Oct. 2, 1941. Frank was born in Nove Mesto Bohemia and Anna was born in Pisek Bohemia. Bessie E. Tomek Fisher born Dec. 21, 1884 Chicago, married Edward George Fisher, June 23, 1906, and are parents of Virginia Fisher Dolan, born Feb. 16, 1908, and Edward Geo. Fisher Jr. born Jan. 14, 1911. - - - - - - - - - - Anna Zak's father had 2 sisters and 2 brothers. The sisters' names were Mrs. Mach and Mrs. Kral. One brother was a weaver. When Anna Zak's parents came to America, he had $7,000. Grandmother Zak's (Anna's mother) name was Rosalie Maska (maiden name). Her Mother was first married at 28 to a man of 66. Her name was Liska. She was married 5 years when this husband died. She inherited his estate which was quite large. She had a daughter in that marrriage named Little Aunty by us. She liveved with the Mandls. She was crippled when a baby and is buried on the Tomek lot. After her husband died, Great Grandmother married at 33 years of age, a student 21 years old. She paid to have him exempt from army services (a very monnon thing done then). His name was Maska - His family was educated. My Grandmother Rosalie Zak was born of this marriage. She also had 2 brothers who went to Russia as gardeners for the late Czar of Russia. One of them married a Hungarian Countess. Grandfather's father was quite a healer by herbs and also setting limbs among the village folks. grandmother's one brother became a Monk in Russia. The other brother bought a baron's Estate in Krakow and made wine. This was all told to me by Aunt Mandl before she died. My grandfather's mother's name was Katharine Bartos - her father's Joseph. My grandmother's mother's name was Anna Dlahos, and her father's name was Jas. Maska. - - - - - - - - - - Children of Frank & Anna Tomek: Bessie E. Fisher Libbie Henderson Georgina Lubking Frank Tomek George W. Tomek Libbie died Aug. 8, 1935 Frank Died in about 1894. Bess attended elementary Cooper School and graduated in 1902 from Medill High School. - - - - - - - - - - Marriage of Grandpa & Grandma Fisher: This certifies that W. F. Fisher and Ellen Hurley were solemnly united by me in the Holy Bonds of Matrimony at St. Peters Church on the 27th day of Sept. in the year of our Lord 1863 conformably to the Ordinance of God and the laws of the Commonwealth. Signed Rev. Father Wm. Quinn in presence of Andrew Fisher and Bridget Husey who were married at the same time. - - - - - - - - - - Children of W. F. Fisher & Ellen Hurley: Wm. H. Fisher born Aug. 16, 1864 Elizabeth Fisher born Mar. 30, 1867 Mary E. Fisher born July 20, 1869 Edward Geo. Fisher born Nov. 20, 1871 Franklin Fisher born Nov. 7, 1873 Ellen Hurley, Mother of above children, was born June 21, 1848. Daleys daughters (Elizabeth Fisher): Lilly Harris, Helen Bishop, Beatrice Englert, Dorothy Preiss. Frank Fisher's children: Helen Smith, Beth Haney, Collette Daly, Frank, Paul, Joseph, Ed, Marie. - - - - - - - - - - Family record of Grandpa Fisher 1. Nancy Fisher born June 24, 1810; died Aug. 20, 1864. 2. J. B. Fisher, June 23, 1811. 3. Adniram (called Andrew), June 11, 1836. 4. Adaline, May 22, 1835. 5. Sarah, April 1, 1841 6. W. F., Aug. 16, 1848. He is the father of Edw. George Fisher. 7. Abbey, June 29, 1850; died Jan. 18, 1884 8. Lucy, Sept. 11, 1853 - - - - - - - - - - Copy of Certificate of Edward Fisher's Baptism: St. Francis Church, 1929 N. 4th St., Milwaukee This is to certify that Edward Fisher, child of William Fisher and Ellen Hurley Fisher, born on the 20th day of Nov. 1871. Baptized the 24th day of Nov, 1871, by Rev. father Daniel Oncap[?]. Sponsors: John Schuler, Catharine Divy[?] Lev, as affixed from the Baptismal registry of the church. Rev. Wm. Peters Oncap, rector - - - - - - - - - - Edward George Fisher died Nov. 30, 1926. number of pension check: XC 2360075. Birth record of E. G. Fisher is recorded in Milwaukee Archdeocese of Milwaukee, 2000 W. Wisconsin Ave., office of Secretary Milwaukee, Rev. Roman R. Atkielski. Edward G. Fisher's Army statistics: Company "C" 1st Regiment Infantry Illinois, U.S. Volunteers, enlisted Apr. 26, 1898, at 27 years. The war ended Nov. 17, 1898. Pension started Mar. 5, 1928, $20 a month. E. Fisher belonged to Wm. McKinely camp #6, United Spanish War Veterans. - - - - - - - - - - Don't grieve too much. I've had a happy and full life. Had a wonderful husband and a family to be proud of. Signed, Bessie E. Fisher TOMEK, Bessie Edith (I00245)
 
106 birth 05 Jan 1893 ?Chicago, Cook, Illinois parents: Joseph Zajicek, Annie Skopeck record title: Illinois, Cook County Birth Registers, 1871-1915 name: Lylie Zajicek birth date: 05 Jan 1893 birthplace: Chicago, Cook, Illinois gender: Female race (original): White race (standardized): White father's name: Joseph Zajicek father's birthplace: Bohemia father's age: 25 mother's name: Annie Skopeck mother's birthplace: Bohemia digital folder number: 4271377 ZAJICEK, Lylie or Lillian (I00739)
 
107 Birth and death dates from cemetery records: http://files.usgwarchives.net/mo/audrain/cemeteries/laddonia.txt DYE, Mildred (I01396)
 
108 Birth town of Kralovic, Bohemia is from Joseph's daughter Viola's death certificate.
New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 Name: Josefa Zajicock Arrival Date: 28 Jul 1883 Birth Date: abt 1865 Age: 18 Gender: Female Ethnicity/ Nationality: Bohemian Place of Origin: Bohemia, Czechoslovakia Port of Departure: Bremen, Germany Destination: New York Port of Arrival: New York, New York Ship Name: Habsburg Source Citation: Year: 1883; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm Roll: 468; Line: 41; List Number: 946. 
ZAJICEK, Joseph (I00751)
 
109 Birth town of Rlzer, Bohemia is from Anna's daughter Viola's death certificate, but it could be a transcription error of "Plzen".

familysearch.org
birth 09 Nov 1865;1866 ?Czechoslovakia
death 22 Aug 1933 ?Antioch, Lake, Illinois
burial 25 Aug 1933 ?Chicago, Cook, Illinois
residence 22 Aug 1933 ?Antioch, Illinois
parents: Skopek
spouse: Joseph Zajicek

record title: Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947
name: Anna Zajicek
death date: 22 Aug 1933
death place: Antioch, Lake, Illinois
gender: Female
age: 67
estimated birth year: 1866
birth date: 09 Nov 1865
birthplace: Czechoslovakia
father: Skopek
father's birth place: Czechoslovakia
mother's birth place: Czechoslovakia
occupation: Housework
residence: Antioch, Illinois
spouse: Joseph Zajicek
burial date: 25 Aug 1933
burial place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois
cemetery: Bohemian Natl.
digital folder number: 4008310
volume/page/certificate number: 30022
familysearch.org
birth 09 Nov 1865;1866 ?Czechoslovakia
death 22 Aug 1933 ?Antioch, Lake, Illinois
burial 25 Aug 1933 ?Chicago, Cook, Illinois
residence 22 Aug 1933 ?Antioch, Illinois
parents: Skopek
spouse: Joseph Zajicek

record title: Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947
name: Anna Zajicek
death date: 22 Aug 1933
death place: Antioch, Lake, Illinois
gender: Female
age: 67
estimated birth year: 1866
birth date: 09 Nov 1865
birthplace: Czechoslovakia
father: Skopek
father's birth place: Czechoslovakia
mother's birth place: Czechoslovakia
occupation: Housework
residence: Antioch, Illinois
spouse: Joseph Zajicek
burial date: 25 Aug 1933
burial place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois
cemetery: Bohemian Natl.
digital folder number: 4008310
volume/page/certificate number: 30022

Birth town of Rlzer, Bohemia is from Anna's daughter Viola's death certificate, but it could be a transcription error of "Plzen".
familysearch.org
birth 09 Nov 1865;1866 ?Czechoslovakia
death 22 Aug 1933 ?Antioch, Lake, Illinois
burial 25 Aug 1933 ?Chicago, Cook, Illinois
residence 22 Aug 1933 ?Antioch, Illinois
parents: Skopek
spouse: Joseph Zajicek

record title: Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947
name: Anna Zajicek
death date: 22 Aug 1933
death place: Antioch, Lake, Illinois
gender: Female
age: 67
estimated birth year: 1866
birth date: 09 Nov 1865
birthplace: Czechoslovakia
father: Skopek
father's birth place: Czechoslovakia
mother's birth place: Czechoslovakia
occupation: Housework
residence: Antioch, Illinois
spouse: Joseph Zajicek
burial date: 25 Aug 1933
burial place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois
cemetery: Bohemian Natl.
digital folder number: 4008310
volume/page/certificate number: 30022

Birth town of Rlzer, Bohemia is from Anna's daughter Viola's death certificate, but it could be a transcription error of "Plzen".
familysearch.org
birth 09 Nov 1865;1866 ?Czechoslovakia
death 22 Aug 1933 ?Antioch, Lake, Illinois
burial 25 Aug 1933 ?Chicago, Cook, Illinois
residence 22 Aug 1933 ?Antioch, Illinois
parents: Skopek
spouse: Joseph Zajicek

record title: Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947
name: Anna Zajicek
death date: 22 Aug 1933
death place: Antioch, Lake, Illinois
gender: Female
age: 67
estimated birth year: 1866
birth date: 09 Nov 1865
birthplace: Czechoslovakia
father: Skopek
father's birth place: Czechoslovakia
mother's birth place: Czechoslovakia
occupation: Housework
residence: Antioch, Illinois
spouse: Joseph Zajicek
burial date: 25 Aug 1933
burial place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois
cemetery: Bohemian Natl.
digital folder number: 4008310
volume/page/certificate number: 30022

Birth town of Rlzer, Bohemia is from Anna's daughter Viola's death certificate, but it could be a transcription error of "Plzen".
 
SKOPEK, Anna (I00752)
 
110 BIRTH, MARRIAGE, & DEATH RECORDS Birth register for the parish of Nove Mesto nad Metuji, [c. 4303] for the years 1837-1873, page 63: Frantisek Tomek was born 24 Dec 1854 in Nove Meste nad Metuji. Father: Antonin Tomek, locksmith, son of Frantisek Tomek, citizen of Nove Mesto nad Metuji and his wife Barbara , daughter of Jan Cihlar, citizen of Nove Mesto nad Metuji. Mother: Marie [Cernova], daughter of Frantisek Cerny, citizen of Nove Mesto nad Metuji and his wife Marie [Kramlova], daughter of Jan Kraml, citizen of Nove Mesto nad Metuji. Illinois marriage license & certificate: The People of the State of Illinois, To any Person Legally Authorized to Solemnize Marriage, Greeting: Marriage may be celebrated between Mr. Frank Tomek of Chicago, in the County of Cook and the State of Illinois, of the age of 28 years, and Miss Anna Zak of Chicago, in they of Cook and State of Illinois, of the age of 18 years. Witnesses: M. W. Ryan, Clerk of the County Court of said Cook County, and the Seal thereof, at my office in Chicago, this 10 day of May A.D. 1884. State of Illinois, County of Cook: I, Edward A. Fisher, Justice of the Peace, hereby certify that Mr. Frank Tomek and Miss Anna Zak were united in Marriage by me at West Chicago in the County of Cook and State of Illinois on the 10 day of884. Illinois death certificate: Frank C. Tomek, 527 Clarence Ave., Oak Park, Cook Co., IL; died same. Resided 5 years in town; U.S. resident 44 years. Male, white, married, wife Anna Tomek. Born 24 Dec 1854; age at death 69 years 29 days. Occupation die maker; retired 3 years; employed by American Cutlery Co. Born Kralove Hre_eck, Czechoslovakia. Father: Anton Tomek, born (not known), Czechoslovakia. Mother: Marie Cerny, born (not known), Czechoslovakia. Informant: Anna Tomek, 527 Clarence Ave. Died 23 Jan 1924; buried 28 Jan 1924, Bohemian National Cemetery, Chicago. Died 9 p.m. of myocardites (of 2 years duration); contributory illness, bronchial asthma (of 2 years duration). Attending physician, Frank Cha_vet, M.D., 619 S. Crawford Ave. Undertaker, Frank Meucl., 1610 S. Craforwd Ave., Lawndale 6481. [Newspaper death notice] Tomek--Anna Zak Tomek of 633 Clinton place, River Forest, and 527 Clarence avenue, Oak Park, wife of the late Frank C. Tomek, mother of Mrs. Bessie Fisher, George W. Tomek, Mrs. Georgina Bigelow, and the late Mrs. Libbie Henderson. Services Saturday, 1:30 p.m. at chapel, 720 Lake street, Oak Park. Interment Bohemian National cemetery. Bohemian National Cemetery Book 2, page 316 Lot 18, Block 5, Section S Lot Owner: Frank Tomek Date of Purchase: May 15, 1895 Price: $75.50 Grave #1, interment #9925: Frank J. Tomak, age 8 mos., 1895 Grave #2, interment #30,700: Anna Liska, 84 yrs., 1913 Grave #3, interment #46,497: Farnk C. Tomek, 69 yrs, 1924 Grave #4, interment #60,880: Libbie A. Henderson, 48 yrs, 1935 Grave #5, interment #62,486: Edward G. Fisher, 65 yrs, 1936 Grave #6, interment #68,264: Anna Tomek, 75 yrs, 1941 Grave #7, interment #95,192: Bessie E. Fisher, 80 yrs, ashes, 1967 Grave #8, interment #98,581: Florence Tomek, 69 yrs, 1971 Grave #9, interment #104,260: George Tomek, 83 yrs, 1979 CENSUS RECORDS 1900 census, Ward 10, Chicago, Cook Co., Illinois: Frank Tomek, 45-M-Bohemia/BOH/BOH Dec 1853, married 16 years, immigrated 1880; naturalized; foreman, machine shop, rents house Anna Tomek, 34-F-BOH/BOH/BOH Jan 1866, wife, 5 children, 4 living Bessie Tomek, 15-F-IL/BOH/BOH Dec 1885, daughter, tail___ Libbie Tomek, 13-F-IL/BOH/BOH Oct 1887, daughter, tail___ Georgia Tomek, 12-F-IL/BOH/BOH Jul 1888, daughter, in school 10 months George Tomek, 4-M-IL/BOH/BOH Nov 1896, son 1910 Census, 34th Ward, Chicago, Cook Co., Illinois: Frank C. Tomek, 55-M-Austria-Bohemia/AUS-BOH/AUS-BOH, married once, married 25 years; immigrated 1880; naturalized; speaks English; die maker in electrical works. Anna Tomek, 44-F-AUS-BOH/AUS-BOH/AUS-BOHY, wife, married once, m. 25 years; 5children, 4 living; immigrated 1868; speaks Eng.; no occupation Libby Tomek, 23-F-IL/AUS-BOH/AUS-BOH, daughter, speaks Eng.; no occupation Georgina Tomek, 21-F-IL/AUS-BOH/AUS-BOH, daughter, speaks Eng.; stenographer in Crayon Co.. George Tomek, 14-M-IL/AUS-BOH/AUS-BOY; son, speaks Eng.; no occupation 1920 census, 527 Clarence Ave., Oak Park, Cook Co., Illinois: Frank Tomek, 64-M-Bohemia/BOH/BOH immigrated 1880, naturalized 1889; die maker, cutlery Anna Tomek, 53-F-BOH/BOH/BOH wife, immigrated 1872, naturalized unk., no occupation Georgina Tomek, 30-F-IL/BOH/BOH daughter, secretary, civil service George W. Tomek, 23-M-IL/BOH/BOH son, road (illegible), International Harv. On the 1930 census Anna Zak Tomek was living with her son-in-law Robert Henderson in River Forest, Cook Co., Illinois. HISTORY & BIOGRAPHY Virginia Dolan: Frank Tomek's birthday was Christmas Eve, and every year Grandma Anna (Zak) Tomek always had the same birthday dinner for him: Baked fish with gingerbread gravy. Because he was the oldest son, he inherited the family estate anand money. But he gave it up to his younger brother, Anton, because he felt sorry for his brother. Then Frank Tomek left Bohemia to make his way in the U.S.A. When he was older, he looked like Mark Twain. He loved to read and was a quiet, shy man. - - - - - - - - - - "Novo Mesto" means New Place or New Town, my grandmother once told me. My grandpa frank Cyril Tomek was the oldest son & would've been exempt from soldiering since he ran the farm. His younger brother would be called by Empereor Franz J, and Grandpa didn't want him to go, so he gave the farm to him and emigrated to the U.S.A. (I think he must have loved his brother very much). He came over when he was around 21 years of age. [Letter written by Virginia Fisher Dolan to Georgina Tomek Lubking] Dearest Ina, I know this next week will be dreadfully hard on you and mother. Grandma was such a darling you'll miss her dreadfully. I keep thinking of her sitting in her rocker always asking for some mending or sewing to do for one--and how sweet andrful she always was. Looking back I can't remember hearing her get cross once or fuss--even when her feet hurt her or she was tired. I hope that I will inherit some of her wonderful cheerfulness of disposition and "sweetness and light." I knoow I find it had to extoll aloud all the fine things she was to each and everyone in her family, but I hope that her character has impressed some of its fine attributes on my character that she might be as prouod of us as we are of having had her as "head of our clan." I am so happy that grandma lived long enuff for her great-grandchildren to enjoy her and become acquainted with her and for her to be able to say, as she did, with such pride, that she had great-grandchildren. As the years pass, we are able to judge fineness in character, and I think grandma really had a wonderful personality--one that we can all be proud of sharing. Love, Virgi IMMIGRATION & NATURALIZATION Passenger and Immigration Lists Index: Frantisek Tomek, age 25; arrival date, 1879; port of arrival, New York, New York [from page 162, vol. 5, Czech Immigration Passenter Lists, by Leo Baca] U.S. Passport Application, Cook Co., Illinois: Frank Tomek, a naturalized and loyal citizen of the United States... born at Novo Mesto, in Bohemia, on or about the 24th day of December 1954; that I emigrated to the United States, sailing on board the Gellert [Gillert?], from Hamburg, on or about the 15th day of May, 1880; that I resided 10 years uninterruptedly, in the United States from 1880 to 1890, at Chicago; that I was naturalized as a citizen of the United States before the Circcuit Court of Cook County, at Chicago, on the 25 day of October, 1889, as shown by the accompanying Certificate of Natrualization; ... my permanent residence being Chicago, Illinois, where I follow the occupation of laborer; that I am about to go abroad temporarily; and that I intend to return to the United States [within] two years... sworn to 22 Oct 1890. Description of applicant: age 36 years; 5'5" tall, high forehead, black eyes, sharp nose, oval mouth, sharp chin, black hair, white complexion, long face. Witness to his identity, Anthony Kozel. TOMEK, Frantisek Cyril (I00248)
 
111 BIRTH, MARRIAGE, & DEATH RECORDS River Forest Optimist (Cook Co., Illinois), 16 Aug 1935: Mrs. Robert W. Henderson Libbie Alice Henderson, 329 Franklin avenue, passed away Friday morning, August 9, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Dorothy Jurgens, 1043 Pleasant street, Oak Park. Although Mrs. Henderson had been in ill health for several months, her deas a shock to her many friends. Born in Chicago, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Tomek, Mrs. Henderson was educated in the Chicago grammar and high schools. On December 25, 1912 she was married to Robert W. Henderson. Moving to River Forest with her family in Apri20, Mrs. Henderson has proved to be an ideal resident. She was a member of River Forest Chapter No. 868, O.E.S., and various other women's organizations. Besides her husband and daughter, Mrs. Henderson is survived by her mother, Mrs. Anna Tomek, and one brother, George Tomek, of 527 Clarence avenue, Oak Park, and two sisters, Mrs. Bessie Fisher and Mrs. Georgina Bigelow, of 633 Clinton plac Funeral services were held at Postlewait's Funeral Chapel, 720 Lake street, oak Park. Rev. Bertram G. Swaney officiated. Interment was in Bohemian National cemetery. CENSUS RECORDS 1920 census, Ward 25, Chicago, Cook Co., IL: Robert W. Henderson, 35-M-OH/OH/OH manager, steam railroad Libbie Henderson, 27-F-IL/Bohemia/BOH Dorothy Henderson, 5y11m-F-IL/OH/IL 1930 census, River Forest, Cook Co., IL: Robert W. Henderson, 45-M-OH/OH/OH married first age 28, exp. engineer, tractor mfg. co. Libbie Alice Henderson, 43-F-IL/BOH/BOH wife, married first age 26 Dorothy Libbie Henderson, 16-F-IL/OH/IL daughter Anna Zak Tomek, 64-F-BOH/BOH/BOH mother-in-law, widowed MILITARY RECORDS World War I Draft Registration: Robert Warren Henderson, age 34; res. ???ston Road, Riverside, Cook Co., IL; born 24 Jul 1884; white; native born citizen; ?? road engineer, employed by International Harvistor Construction? and Tractor Works, 2600 W. 31st St., Chicago, Cook Co., IL; nearest relative, Libbie Henderson (same address); tall, stout, blue eyes, light hair; registered 12 Sep 1918, Cook Co., Illinois. TOMEK, Libbie Alice (I00174)
 
112 BIRTH, MARRIAGE, & DEATH RECORDS Social Security Death Index: Georgina Lubking, born 18 Jul 1888; died Jun 1974; last residence, Ducor, Tulare Co., California; issued 1965 in California. John Lubking, born 20 Mar 1898; died Dec 1980; last residence, Ducor, Tulare Co., California; issued 1955 in California. California Death Index: Georgina M. Lubking; female; born 18 Jul 1897, Illinois; died 13 Jun 1974, Tulare Co.. John P. Lubking; male; born 20 Mar 1898, California; died 30 Dec 1980, Tulare Co.; mother's maiden name, Grendes. [Note: According to Virginia Fisher Dolan, Ina lied about her age when she married John Lubking so that he wouldn't know how much older she was than he was; also, she wanted him to think she was still in her child-bearing years.] MILITARY RECORDS World War I Draft Registration: John Philip Lubking, age 20; res. Ducor, Tulare Co., California; born 20 Mar 1898; white; native born citizen; farmer; employed by Henry A. Lubking (same address); nearest relative, Henry A. Lubking (same address); tall, medium build, blue eyes, light hair; registered 12 Sep 1918, Lindsay, Tulare Co., California. HISTORY & BIOGRAPHY AH, YES, I REMEMBER! (Autobiographical sketch by Ina Lubking) My very first recollection of being alive was that Mama held me when I was sick. (I apparently was subject to bronchitis quite often.) Mama had a lady visitor, and we were sitting around the heating stove which was almost in the centere dining room at 718 W. 18th St. At times there was a bed in this room, possibly when one of us was ill, as I was at that time. There were two bedrooms in the five-room flat. Each bedroom had a window facing a brick wall of the two-story building next door, with about a twelve-inch air space. On the first floor of that building was a saloon. In the winter time no windows were ever opened. In the dining room was a square oak table and chairs, a couch, and an oak dresser with two "huge" (for me) white frosted glass vases with fluted tops, into which went old mail and other sundry items. The vases had gaily painted flowers ane a joy to behold (possibly a wedding gift). I remember being examined by a doctor at various times. The parlour during the winter was a veritable refrigerator, and was hardly ever occupied, and it was like braving the outdoors to go through that room to the front bedroom, which waor a time, occupied by Mr. Konrad. Later we three girls slept there, in feather beds in the winter, and were never cold. The bedroom had a clothes closet under the stairs, without a door, and was a good place for storying things and for playing hide-and-go-seek. For a long time after he left, Mr. Konrad's trunk was still there. Another time I remember being held by my mother, who again had a lady visitor, and we sat in the dining room. They were talking about Papa, who was in Europe at the time and expected home very soon. Mother must have told me that Papa hado on a train and on a ship to get there, because for years afterward, whenever I heard a train whistle, I would think of Europe and Grandma, and my imagination would roam to far-off lands. Then the big day arrived: Papa came home from the station in an express wagon with his sister, her husband, and their very young daughter (the Huleks), and all their baggage, no doubt consisting of a lot of feather beds, as that was the moportant part of a Bohemian girl's trousseau. They moved into the rear apartment above ours, with a kitchen, a parlor, and a bedroom. Entrance to the apartment was through the kitchen from the hallway. This hall also gave access to the front apartment of two rooms; also a ladder which led to the attic. How we loved that attic! At one time Papa had pigeons in the loft, and I used to love to go there with Mama when she fed them. I don't remember ever eating them, however, but no doubt that was the purpose in raising them. The front apartment had one large room with a bedroom. It had an iron sink and a pantry, as did the other apartment. How we used to love to "play house" there when it was vacant, and when it was occupied, we used to like to visit the te, if they were agreeable to having us around. I did get around, and all over the neighborhood, there is no doubt about that. Our homes were 781 W. 18th St., 1530 W. 22nd St., 896 So. Hamlin Ave., 1515 So. Hamlin Ave., and 527 Clarence Ave., Oak Park. I attended five grammar school. No wonder I was considered dumb, at least so I considered myself. The schools wooper, Cooper Annex at Ashland & 17th St., Spry, Howland, and Lawson. I remember playing in the vacant lot next door to us on 18th Street before a three-story building was erected there. The wooden sidewalk was high above the lot level. The lot was always full of trash, and it was fun to see what we couldnd. One of my great thrills was looking on the beams under the wooden sidewalk for pennies hidden there by a half-wit son of the saloon keeper next door. His name was Frank. He was either the son or nephew of the man. The man was at that timme living with his housekeeper, who had a daughter with whom I used to play. I used to spend a lot of time in their kitchen, where there was always an odor of fish cooking; food was forever cooking on the stove, for they served a free lunch with drinks, and even a full dinner for a few cents, as was the custom in those days. The meat counter was always a rather high affair, coming to about chest level with a man. In the summer time a fan (when there was electricity) was twirling aboove the counter; otherwise it was covered with a cotton netting to keep off the many flies. The saloon keeper's name was Sherman (pronounced Sharman). I remember I could always tell when it was Saturday. There would be a general cleaning up oof the windows of the saloon and the sidewalk, and the huge brewery trucks rolled barrels of beer into the cellar, and (in the summer) ice was delivered. It was then we would hop on the back step of the wagon and help ourselves to pieces of ice, which we loved to suck. The ice man wore a leather cape over one shoulder. He would take a huge chunk of ice in his ice prongs and swing it over his shoulder, or if the ice was going into the cellar, they would roll down a specially built ladder. In fact, most of the store keepers washed their windows on Saturday. In the winter we children used to press pennies against the heavily frosted window panes, and Mama pointed out to us the beautiful leaves Jack Frost left on our windows. Some times we would press our lips and noses against the frosted panet not for long. If we wanted to see outside, we would breathe hard on the glass and make a peep hole. Snows were very deep in those winters. Tunnels were made in front of the homes to get across the street, and when it was not too cold, we would be out playing in the snow, shoveling it, and getting wet, then coming home to sit around the heating stove to dry out. After the building went up next door, there were a lot of tenants to pester us. They used to throw trash into our yard, which we in turn had to pick up and put in our garbage box. This was a huge wooden affair, which Papa made, with lidsth ends into which went everything. Ashes would be thrown in piles in the alleys, which were cleaned only before an election. The stench from the alley in the summer time was awful. In summer the boxes were full of maggots. During election i it was a great sport for the young hoodlums in those days to burn the wooden garbage bins. Since they were too large to move, they would burn on the spot, and it was touch and go. I remember Papa had several set-to's with these hoods, for they were very destructive, but they only laughed at him. One game they used to play, which we dreaded, was "Run sheep run," but which we called "Run cheap run." They would run through our yard at all times of the night and do whatever damage they could. Their favorite sport was knocking down Chick Sales, but ours was a triple affair, so it was quite rigid. The space under our high wooden sidewalk always intrigued us. We never knew who might be hiding there. It was damp and dark inside, and when we did have the courage to go there, or when Mama was around, we would take a peep and see sicklying weeds or toadstools growing. At times it was quite muddy there since water and melting snow would leak through the cracks of the sidewalk. Mama feared some tramp might be hiding there. At night it was a scary place. There was a rather long, narrow porch from the sidewalk to our front hall, which was a nice place to spend a summer evening. Sometimes we would have a swing on this porch, but that was when we were very small. Across our sidewalk was a wooden fence, on which we children used to love to sit. One summer evening there were just too many sitters on the fence, and it gave way, and I with it. I don't remember if anyone else hit the bottom, but I did it knocked me cold. Mother and Dad were quite concerned with me, but I finally came to. So-o-o-o, if you think there is something queer about your sister Ina, charge it to that fall. Of a summer evening, when the family was out on the porch watching the crowds go by (also the horse cars), we used to tie a piece of watermelon rind to a string and throw it over the electric wire, then catch it & tie a lantern to it. We mhe lanterns out of paper shoe boxes. We would cut fancy holes in them and cover them with colored tissue paper, then put a candle inside, light it, and up it went. Then we would play with the string, up and dow she would go until the candle burned out or the box set on fire. Whatta sport! In the new building there was a shoe store, owned by a Bohemian Jew named Kapper. His method of displaying shoes was in vogue then. It consisted of four boards nailed into a sort of standing box-like affair, covered with paper. The shoes of the shoes would be tied together and hung on a nail on this box-like affair. These adorned the sidewalk not only around the building, but on the outer edge of the sidewalk, much like old Maxwell Street. Doubtless it was an old country custom. Kapper carried a very cheap line of shoes. Mama used to say they were paper shoes, and we never traded there. They had a baby born with two thumbs. He looked just like a monkey, but he did not live very long. At Christmas time we had a tree with real candles, but not very many ornaments. We used to buy pink colored popcorn at a certain store on 18th St. east of Blue Island Ave. (north side of street). This we would string and hang on the trebut usually it was eaten before the holidays were over. Papa used to buy the nuts and candy that went into our stockings and used to leave it on a shelf in the back hall. Our stockings were filled twice: Once on St. Nicholas (Dec. 6) and agaiin on Christmas Eve. Our grocer's son got coal in his stocking one year because he had been a bad boy. We used to love to get up early those mornings to see what Santa Claus had left us, and we were never disappointed. The only thrill that can equal that was when I married John. Our aunts and uncles were very stingy. Though they were far better off financially than we were, they seldom gave us anything at Christmas time. I think it was that very thing that made me want to give our children a happier memory of thent Ina, than I have of my own. And this brings me to our grocer, Mr. Blazek. They had four girls and two boys. The oldest daughter, Mary, kept house with the mother. She was a young lady then. Joe, the oldest son, worked for a wholesale grocery concern, Steele Wedelle died of TB just before he was to be married. Rose, the next oldest daughter, worked in the store. She was a very pleasant person, and later married Mr. Blaha, a mail carrier. The father and mother also worked in the store. In the winter time they used to be dressed as though they were going outdoors. It was so cold, the windows were always heavily frosted. They did a good business. Their youngest son was Frank, who went to school and also helped the father. The two youngest girls were our friends, the youngest being my special friend. It was she who first called me "Ina," and the name has stuck ever since. TOMEK, Georgina Marie (I04572)
 
113 Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration made in the Probate Registries of the High Court of Justice in England Source (S333)
 
114 Census of Ireland 1901/1911 Source (S319)
 
115 CENSUS RECORDS 1930 census, 704 West California Street, Urbana, Cunningham Twp., Champaign Co., IL: Thomas J. Dolan, 23-M-IL/IL/IL married first age 22, teacher, state university Virginia B. Dolan, 22-F-IL/IL/IL wife, married first age 21 DOLAN, Thomas James (I01032)
 
116 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841 Source (S378)
 
117 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841 Source (S383)
 
118 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841 Source (S339)
 
119 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851 Source (S340)
 
120 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851 Source (S337)
 
121 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851 Source (S365)
 
122 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851 Source (S379)
 
123 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851 Source (S370)
 
124 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861 Source (S363)
 
125 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861 Source (S341)
 
126 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861 Source (S373)
 
127 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861 Source (S338)
 
128 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861 Source (S375)
 
129 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871 Source (S358)
 
130 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871 Source (S372)
 
131 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871 Source (S374)
 
132 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871 Source (S357)
 
133 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1881 Source (S364)
 
134 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891 Source (S336)
 
135 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891 Source (S369)
 
136 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891 Source (S356)
 
137 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891 Source (S334)
 
138 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891 Source (S366)
 
139 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901 Source (S332)
 
140 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901 Source (S355)
 
141 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901 Source (S351)
 
142 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901 Source (S362)
 
143 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911 Source (S331)
 
144 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911 Source (S352)
 
145 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911 Source (S335)
 
146 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I00814)
 
147 Chvoy, Mary A.
April 28, 2006

Mary A. Chvoy, at rest April 26, 2006, 50 year resident of Berwyn/Cicero area, dear mother of Andrew T. Chvoy. Visitation Saturday from 11 a.m. until time of Service at Abram & Sons Home for Funerals, 6910 Windsor. Funeral to Woodlawn Cemetery. Info, 708-788-1103
 
FEDOR, Mary Antonia (I03911)
 
148 Comments: Hi,
I have a Real ancestor from Pallasgreen/Ballinaclough. I see that you have a Patrick O'Brien born to Bartholomew O'Brien & Anne Real. Do you have a baptism or birth record for him? Annie, daughter of Bart O'Brien & Anne Real married Patrick Ryan of Pallasgreen. They had only one son, Pakie and as I far as I know, he didn't marry or have children.

Has any descendant of this Patrick O'Brien taken a DNA test? I have my DNA results on FTDNA, Ancestry & Gedmatch, it would be interesting to see if we match.

best regards,

Mary

Mary McGrath
 
O'BRIEN, Anne (I00030)
 
149 Cook County, Illinois, Marriages Index, 1871-1920 Name: Joseph Zajicek Age: 22 Gender: Male Birth Year: abt 1886 Marriage Type: Marriage Marriage Date: 5 Sep 1908 Marriage Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois Spouse Name: Miss Emma Pelc Spouse Age: 22 Spouse Gender: Female FHL Film Number: 1030445 Source Information: Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Marriages Index, 1871-1920 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922 Name: Joe Zajicek Birth Date: 18 Oct 1886 Birth Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois Ethnicity: American Gender: Male Race: White Father Name: Frank Zapick Father's Age: 24 Mother Name: Mary Kucera FHL Film Number: 1287731 Source Information: Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. ZAJICEK, Joseph (I02299)
 
150 Date:10 Mar 1890 Groom's Forename(s):Walter Groom's Surname:Fletcher Groom's Condition:Bachelor Groom's Age:23 Groom's Father's Forename(s):William Groom's Father's Surname:Fletcher Bride's Forename(s):Elizabeth Bride's Surname: Constable Church Family F00776
 

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